Indigenous Australians

Policing responses to substance misuse in rural and remote indigenous communities

The report from a National Workshop held at the Crowne Plaza, Alice Springs, 29 - 30 August 2007

Policing substance abuse in Indigenous communities

This report outlines the results of a workshop that was held in Mildura, Victoria on 5 and 6 August 2008.

Policing alcohol and illicit drug use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in metropolitan environments

Policing affords many opportunities for individual officers and police services to improve outcomes for community members and reduce the burden of substance misuse on the community. Key points highlighted concerning metropolitan areas include:

  • A broad spectrum of services is available (albeit acknowledged to often be under-resourced), providing police with a range of referral points for and information sources about local area issues.  
  • Service providers and other agencies may also be variously accountable for public safety. Police may develop partnerships with these agencies, ensuring that tight resources can be appropriately directed to meet community needs.

Service providers can help police to better understand the complex life circumstances of individuals affected by alcohol and other drugs. Benefits of information exchanges can be twofold i.e. improved police confidence in handling complex situations; and increased awareness within the service sector of the range of tasks and behaviours police are expected to perform and manage.

An investigation into the influx of Indigenous 'visitors' to Darwin's Long Grass from remote NT communities - Phase 2

Being undesirable: law, health and life in Darwin’s Long Grass

Plain English summary and implications for police prepared by Roger Nicholas.

Policing, volatile substance misuse, and Indigenous Australians

Plain English summary and implications for police prepared by Roger Nicholas.

An investigation into the influx of Indigenous 'visitors' to Darwin's Long Grass from remote NT communities - Phase 2

Being undesirable: law, health and life in Darwin’s Long Grass

This study asked the question, What do Aboriginal people staying in Darwin's Long Grass require to attain an acceptable level of health and life quality and to be law abiding citizens? The views and experiences of 550 participants were explored through three stages of fieldwork.