Monographs

Monograph no. 28

Predicting alcohol-related harms from licensed outlet density: A feasibility study

The overall aim of this feasibility study was to progress the development of an Australian model sensitive to local risk factors to help authorities determine appropriate liquor outlet densities for minimising alcohol-related harms within communities.

Monograph no. 26

Making Sense of Partnerships

A study of police and housing department collaboration for tackling drug and related problems on public housing estates

Monograph no. 22

Benzodiazepine and pharmaceutical opioid misuse and their relationship to crime

Tasmanian Report

The purpose of this major research project was to contribute to law enforcement sector understanding of the relationship between benzodiazepine and pharmaceutical opioid misuse and crime in three select Australian jurisdictions (Victoria, Tasmania, Northern Territory) where there is evidence of illicit prescription pharmaceutical markets. This report focuses on the Tasmanian aspect of the study. While the primary focus of the study remains on law enforcement interests in relation to licit and illicit benzodiazepine and pharmaceutical opioid markets, these are discussed in relation to the broader public health implications of supply reduction efforts in a harm minimisation framework.

Monograph no. 21

Benzodiazepine and pharmaceutical opioid misuse and their relationship to crime - An examination of illicit prescription drug markets in Melbourne, Hobart and Darwin

National Overview report

The National Drug Law Enforcement Research Fund sought tenders in 2002 for research to enhance law enforcement sector understanding of the structure and functioning of illicit drug markets in Australia - with a particular focus on illicit markets for prescription pharmaceuticals namely benzodiazepine and pharmaceutical opioids, their misuse and impact on crime in Victoria, Tasmania and the Northern Territory, where there is evidence of illicit prescription pharmaceutical markets. While the primary focus of the study remains on law enforcement interests in relation to licit and illicit benzodiazepine and pharmaceutical opioid markets, where warranted these are discussed in relation to the broader public health implications of the range of interventions potentially available as a response to the markets being examined, and their impact. This report presents a review of the literature, an overview of study methodology, key findings and jurisdiction-specific discussion points. The section outlining the key findings is structured according to the main study themes of market characteristics, diversion and links to crime, implications for police and other front line workers, and interventions.

Monograph no. 20

The impact of drugs on road crashes, assaults and other trauma - a prospective trauma toxicology study

The primary objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and patterns of use of specific recreational drugs in all patients with injuries requiring assessment by a trauma team at the Royal Adelaide Hospital over a one-year period. The other specific objectives included determining an estimate of the prevalence and patterns of drug use, and severity of injury, in patients presenting to the Emergency Department of the Royal Adelaide Hospital (patients of lesser severity of injury not requiring trauma service management) following a motor vehicle accident and other trauma. It also aimed to examine the correlation between drug use and mechanism, pattern, and severity of injury in patients presenting to the Royal Adelaide Hospital following a motor vehicle accident, and the epidemiological and demographic patterns associated with drug use and trauma.

Monograph no. 19

Impact of the heroin shortage: Additional research

In early 2001, Australia experienced a sudden and dramatic decrease in heroin availability, concomitant with increases in price and decreases in purity. This phenomenon, known as the 'heroin shortage', was assessed in a comprehensive body of research examining the causes, course and consequence of the shortage). As a result of those findings a number of additional questions were raised, and some findings required further and more detailed analysis, which are addressed in the current report. The aims of the research presented in this report were to: i) assess what impact, if any, the heroin shortage had on initiation to heroin use; ii) examine whether the associated increase in cocaine use led to a) an increase in violent crime and b) an increase in sex work; iii) provide a more detailed and analytical analysis of fatal and non-fatal drug overdose; and iv) provide a closer examination of the impact of law enforcement operations on harm reduction in the context of the heroin shortage.

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